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Wednesday, July 08, 2020 

Deutche Welle's history of black superheroes

The Deutche Welle website's written a list of black heroes created over past decades. Not much here I hadn't already noted myself over time, but here's a part about the Falcon that looks misleading:
In the late 1960s, the first African-American superhero appeared in a mainstream comic: Samuel Wilson, aka "Falcon." Introduced by Stan Lee and Gene Colan in 1969 in Captain America, he could fly on mechanical wings and controlled birds via telepathy. The superhero from Harlem often slipped into the role of Captain America.
Excuse me? I thought it was just 5 years ago Sam Wilson first donned the Red, White & Blue, all for the sake of leftist propaganda Nick Spencer and company were pushing at the time. Even more bizarre is that this article does cite Black Panther preceding Falcon in mainstream by 3 years:
Black Panther is the most famous and first Black superhero with supernatural abilities in American mainstream comics. The character was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. He appeared for the first time as a supporting character in a Fantastic Four comic published by Marvel in 1966.
T'Challa may have first debuted as a supporting cast member, but he was more or less the first costumed black superhero in mainstream, and certainly in Marvel's universe. And, he soon went on to make appearances in the Avengers, and Captain America's solo adventures as a special guest star. Funny how sloppy DW's coverage is here. But, maybe that could explain why they sink into needless political propaganda at the end:
More than four decades later, the movie adaptation of Black Panther, directed by Ryan Coogler, the first Black Marvel film director, was released in 2018. It was a critically acclaimed box office hit. The film's popularity, along with the fact that a sequel is planned for 2021 and the current socio-political situation are giving a boost to the comic series.

And, in reaction to the Black Lives Matter movement, new Black heroes could emerge from characters currently on the sidelines, believes Andreas Platthaus. However, he adds, more Black comic writers and illustrators are needed to give "Black self-confidence" a stronger voice in the comics. "Only then will there be fundamental change."
Wow, what a disappointment DW's chosen to exploit the subject for hammering everyone over the head with a phony propaganda movement that's only done more harm than good. Surely the biggest irony is that they reject an emancipation statue of Lincoln, which was funded by former slaves in its time. With the way things are going, it makes little difference whether there's more black writers and illustrators today, it's not bound to save comicdom. Not if all they can build the medium on now is deliberate propaganda. The last paragraphs in the article spoil everything.

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Nick Spencer's Capt. America actually had right wing, not left wing, propaganda in it. He made fun of the idea of trigger warnings, and his Sam Wilson sacrificed justice to a trickle-down theory of economics, letting rich crooks go unpunished because he decided tht exposing them would cause economic damage harmful to the people they employed.

"T'Challa may have first debuted as a supporting cast member, but he was more or less the first costumed black superhero in mainstream, and certainly in Marvel's universe. And, he soon went on to make appearances in the Avengers, and Captain America's solo adventures as a special guest star. Funny how sloppy DW's coverage is here."

They do not seem sloppy. They are not saying anything different from what you say, other than compressing the history by skipping over his becoming an Avengers member.

----Even more bizarre is that this article does cite Black Panther preceding Falcon in mainstream by 3 years------

Y bizarre? T'Challa was the 1st African superhero. He wasn't American. Falcon was the 1st "mainstream" African-American superhero.

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  • I'm Avi Green
  • From Jerusalem, Israel
  • I was born in Pennsylvania in 1974, and moved to Israel in 1983. I also enjoyed reading a lot of comics when I was young, the first being Fantastic Four. I maintain a strong belief in the public's right to knowledge and accuracy in facts. I like to think of myself as a conservative-style version of Clark Kent. I don't expect to be perfect at the job, but I do my best.
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