« Home | Frank Miller used his Master Race mini as leftist ... » | A manga Kindle program with bigger storage » | IDW seeks to do TV/movie adapting through panderin... » | A Marvel story about Syrian war could be just as d... » | The SJW theft of the mainstream » | Educational comics for helping dyslectic students » | Miley Cyrus has a problem with Supergirl's gender » | The SJW demands to turn Iron Fist Asian are still ... » | Some creators bashing Trump are even more hypocrit... » | Will "Love is Love" acknowledge the facts about th... » 

Friday, October 21, 2016 

A sugarcoated look at Image's origins

Vice's Creators Project gives a pretty superficial view of how Image was founded in the early 1990s, most tellingly in their notes on Rob Liefeld:
The company first came about after artists and writers Todd McFarlane (creator of Spawn), Jim Lee, and Rob Liefeld left Marvel after huge successes. They (and the other like-minded comic creators who joined them) felt they weren’t being justly compensated for their meteoric work, so they split and Image was born. “These weren’t just hot headed kids rebelling against the system,” kaptainkristian explains in the video. “These were the driving forces of the entire industry. Comics were picking up steam, and the creators wanted equal compensation.” This desire drives the central ethos behind Image: all comics are 100% owned by the people who create them.

As soon as they formed the new company, readership followed. “For just a short time,” says kaptainkristian, “what was popular were the books and the creators, not just the characters. Image was a gateway for millions of new fans to get into comics, and it also served as a jumping-on point for people too intimidated by the four or five decades of history and continuity of Marvel and DC comics.”
Was it the creators? I suppose you could say that, but what's certainly lacking here is any note on the quality of the writing, and in Liefeld's case, the artwork. What drove Image in at least some instances was, most unfortunately, the speculator bubble, variant and silver foil-style covers that were little more than cheap gimmicks. Liefeld himself all but left after fallouts with the rest of staff over Youngblood, which had a very troubled publication history as it is.

Did the above artists have big successes? Yes, but in Liefeld's case, it was for all the wrong reasons, as his artwork did not a good book make, and the quality of New Mutants plummeted due to his incompetent style (so what did Marvel do? Replaced it with X-Force, which didn't come at a great time for superherodom). McFarlane and Lee are far more talented artists, though Spawn is really nothing to write home about. And did the medium really pick up steam? Not for long, and it sank down again after the speculator bubble burst pretty quickly.

As for people worried about decades of continuity in the mainstream superhero worlds, here's something to consider: it was only by the mid-90s that things really started to deteriorate, and bad storytelling is the real reason why anybody should find a lot of continuity troubling. There's also the fact that by that decade, it seems like that's all most writers could think of doing; harkening back to whatever they thought was great for alluding to, even if their newer story pales terribly next to the older one. I'd also suggest too much reliance on costumed supervillains and such as adversaries hurt superhero tales. Even too many time travel stories must've taken a toll. How come those aren't considered as a potential factor in the decline and fall of superherodom? But surely the biggest fault is failure to judge each separate story on its own terms, not to mention the Big Two making it exceedingly difficult with their crossovers, something Image is guilty of taking up at times too.

At least they admit the above artists were only popular for a short time. And that's because - certainly in Liefeld's case - most people realized his work didn't have high value, and the Image books were only being bought by speculators, which hasn't changed much since. The approach to marketing is another serious fault. If comicdom had changed its approach and gone with a more paperback-style format where an ongoing series came out just 2-3 times a year, the industry could've weathered the storms much better, and I don't get why most people don't bring that up.

Labels: , , , , , ,



Great points you made, thanks for the tips. This is an easy way to learn about unknown stuffs and know what they do thereby creating a business relationship. I love these stuffs that relates to my topic of one’s writing or general good points are great way to go.

Post a Comment

Links to this post

Create a Link

About me

  • I'm Avi Green
  • From Jerusalem, Israel
  • I was born in Pennsylvania in 1974, and moved to Israel in 1983. I also enjoyed reading a lot of comics when I was young, the first being Fantastic Four. I maintain a strong belief in the public's right to knowledge and accuracy in facts. I like to think of myself as a conservative-style version of Clark Kent. I don't expect to be perfect at the job, but I do my best.
My profile

Archives

Links

  • avigreen2002@yahoo.com
  • Fansites I Created

  • Hawkfan
  • The Greatest Thing on Earth!
  • The Outer Observatory
  • Earth's Mightiest Heroines
  • The Co-Stars Primer
  • Comic book websites (open menu)

    Comic book weblogs (open menu)

    Writers and Artists (open menu)

    Miscellanous links (open menu)

  • GoStats charts
  • W3 Counter stats
  • Click here to see website statistics
  • blog directory Bloggeries Blog Directory Top Blogs Entertainment blogs Entertainment Blogs
    Entertainment blog TopOfBlogs
    View My Stats

    AmazingCounters.com

    Comics blog Blog Directory & Search engine blog directory eXTReMe Tracker Locations of visitors to this page

    This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

    make money online blogger templates

Older Posts Newer Posts

The Four Color Media Monitor is powered by Blogspot and Gecko & Fly.
No part of the content or the blog may be reproduced without prior written permission.
Join the Google Adsense program and learn how to make money online.